Beulah Church Road

No longer will they call you Deserted, or name your land Desolate. But you will be called Hephzibah, and your land Beulah; for the Lord will take delight in you, and your land will be married.

–          Isaiah 62:4

 

I’m kind of homesick for a country To which I’ve never been before. No sad goodbyes will there be spoken For time won’t matter anymore.

Beulah Land (Beulah Land) I’m longing for you (I’m longing for you) And some day (And some day) on thee I’ll stand (Someday we will stand) There my home (There my home) shall be eternal (Eternal) Beulah Land, sweet Beulah Land

I’m looking now, just across the river To where my faith, shall end in sight (Shall end in sight) There’s just a few more days to labor. Then I will take my heavenly flight.

Beulah Land (Beulah Land) I’m longing for you (I’m longing for you) And some day (And some day) on thee I’ll stand (Someday we will stand) There my home (There my home) shall be eternal Beulah Land, sweet Beulah Land Beulah Land, oh it’s Beulah Land Oh Beulah Land, sweet Beulah Land

–           Squire Parsons, Beulah Land

 

 

I have an earworm.  On our trips south, we almost always go from Columbus, OH to Louisville, KY.  On the bypass around Louisville, the exit that is two exits before the one that we take is Beulah Church Road.  I saw the sign and started singing Beulah Land, and it has been stuck in my head for a full week.  I don’t think that I am passing over the river to Beulah Land anytime soon, but it is not a bad song to have stuck in your head either.

 

We may only have a few more days to labor as the song says, but most evangelism training focuses away from the old question of “Where will you be if you die tonight?”  The Myers-Briggs Temperament Index studies will tell you that 75% of people prefer to live in the here-and-now as opposed to living for the possibility of what might be.  But that doesn’t mean that people don’t think about it.

 

People in Louisville and other places along the major rivers of the eastern US are thinking of nothing but the here-and-now – for the moment.  The floods that have caused people to lose property, possessions, and lives of loved ones is at the forefront of their lives.

 

On our return trip, we took the outer by-pass around Louisville and Cincinnati, OH, but when we crossed the Ohio River on the by-pass, the exit on the Ohio side was closed.  A park at the exit was underwater as well as the roads.  I am sure that there were houses that were flooded nearby.  Most of the devastation can only be reached by boat or by air.

 

When I saw the farmer’s fields south of Louisville that were underwater, I thought of the timing.  The Spring thaw is usually later in the year.  With the addition of Spring rains, fields can have seed washed away or the fields can be too wet to prepare for planting.  Having the thaw in February might be a blessing, if…

 

We have no idea whether this is the end to winter or whether the rain will end once Spring arrives so that the farmers can plant on land that is now under water.  Each year, it is by God’s Grace that we have what we need when we need it.

 

I listened to the reports from the tornadoes yesterday.  The loss of life is tragic, but the loss of property can be restored.  What is priceless are the bus loads of volunteers to help clean up.  Cleaning up is the first step in rebuilding and the first sign of hope.

 

We have hope that God will help us through each day.  Those who have lost their homes to the floods or the tornadoes will rebuild, but their home is still subject to the weather and other catastrophes.

 

Yet, regardless of modern trends in evangelism, we need a rock to stand on when everything is crumbling around us.  We need assurance that “some day on thee (Beulah Land) I’ll stand.  There my home shall be eternal.  Beulah Land, sweet Beulah Land.”

 

God has promised, and He is faithful.  There is hope for today and hope for tomorrow.

 

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