Sing, Sing a Song

“I tell you, I will not drink from this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.”

When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.

Then Jesus told them, “This very night you will all fall away on account of me, for it is written:

“‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock will be scattered.’

–          Matthew 26:29-31

 

“Was it not brave for our dear Lord to sing under such circumstances?  He was going forth to his last dread conflict – to Gethsemane, Gabbatha, and Golgotha – yet he went with a song on his lips.  The door opens, they go downstairs, they are in the open air – that night of the full moon – and they wend their way to the Mount of Olives.  Then came that desperate struggle in which the great Captain of our salvation wrestled even to a bloody sweat and prevailed.”

–          Charles H. Spurgeon

 

 

What did Jesus sing with His disciples?  If you think about it, the Psalms come to mind.  But within the Psalms, what?  Jesus will soon quote Psalm 22, but would He sing it to imprint His words on His disciples before He says those words from the cross?  Would He sing an upbeat Psalm, a Psalm of gladness and praise?  What about Psalm 23?  Does it matter?  They sang.

 

There was a song, entitled “Sing”, that came out while I was in college.

 

Sing, sing a song
Sing out loud
Sing out strong
Sing of good things not bad
Sing of happy not sad

Sing, sing a song
Make it simple to last
Your whole life long
Don’t worry that it’s not
Good enough for anyone
Else to hear
Just sing, sing a song

Sing, sing a song
Let the world sing along
Sing of love there could be
Sing for you and for me

Sing, sing a song
Make it simple to last
Your whole life long
Don’t worry that it’s not
Good enough for anyone
Else to hear
Just sing, sing a song
(Just sing, sing a song)
Just sing, sing a song

–          Joseph G. Raposo, Sing

 

I have read that Scotsmen, when not at war themselves, would become mercenaries around the globe.  It struck fear in the enemy to hear the skirl of the bagpipes as the enemy charged against them.

 

The American airborne divisions have two songs that they sing.  Each speaks of a parachute that did not open and the soldier fell to his death:  Blood on the Risers (or Gory, Gory What a Helluva Way to Die) and Beautiful Streamer.  In each song, the unlucky soldier gets a streamer, a chute that flutters, but never opens.  Both are sung to well known tunes.  This is gallows humor, a means of alleviating fear before battle.  Jesus would soon sweat blood, a condition known as hematidrosis (or hematohidrosis), but I doubt that He would use gallows humor to bolster His strength and courage.

 

Yet, could Jesus have sung to bolster the courage of His disciples?  He follows the song with a prophecy that they would each fall away, not just Peter.  He knew their weaknesses.  He knew they needed a song in their heart.

 

We need to have God’s Word imprinted on our hearts, but a few songs on your heart can have an added psychological boost.  Think of Paul and Silas (Acts 16:16-40).  They were beaten and thrown into prison.  They prayed and sang hymns.  They gained the curiosity of the other inmates, and when the earthquake freed them – but they did not leave, the jailer and his family became baptized.

 

Do you have a favorite hymn or worship song?  Do you wake up with a Christian song as an earworm in your ear?  God can communicate through song as well as the Bible and prayer, and a song can be a good addition to other disciplines toward Christian growth.

 

Soli Deo Gloria.  Only to God be the Glory.

 

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