Other Prayers (10) – Daniel Praises, Confesses, and Intercedes

I prayed to the Lord my God and confessed:

“Lord, the great and awesome God, who keeps his covenant of love with those who love him and keep his commandments, we have sinned and done wrong. We have been wicked and have rebelled; we have turned away from your commands and laws.  We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name to our kings, our princes and our ancestors, and to all the people of the land.

“Lord, you are righteous, but this day we are covered with shame—the people of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem and all Israel, both near and far, in all the countries where you have scattered us because of our unfaithfulness to you.  We and our kings, our princes and our ancestors are covered with shame, Lord, because we have sinned against you.  The Lord our God is merciful and forgiving, even though we have rebelled against him; we have not obeyed the Lord our God or kept the laws he gave us through his servants the prophets.  All Israel has transgressed your law and turned away, refusing to obey you.

“Therefore the curses and sworn judgments written in the Law of Moses, the servant of God, have been poured out on us, because we have sinned against you.  You have fulfilled the words spoken against us and against our rulers by bringing on us great disaster. Under the whole heaven nothing has ever been done like what has been done to Jerusalem.  Just as it is written in the Law of Moses, all this disaster has come on us, yet we have not sought the favor of the Lord our God by turning from our sins and giving attention to your truth.  The Lord did not hesitate to bring the disaster on us, for the Lord our God is righteous in everything he does; yet we have not obeyed him.

“Now, Lord our God, who brought your people out of Egypt with a mighty hand and who made for yourself a name that endures to this day, we have sinned, we have done wrong.  Lord, in keeping with all your righteous acts, turn away your anger and your wrath from Jerusalem, your city, your holy hill. Our sins and the iniquities of our ancestors have made Jerusalem and your people an object of scorn to all those around us.

“Now, our God, hear the prayers and petitions of your servant. For your sake, Lord, look with favor on your desolate sanctuary.  Give ear, our God, and hear; open your eyes and see the desolation of the city that bears your Name.  We do not make requests of you because we are righteous, but because of your great mercy.  Lord, listen! Lord, forgive! Lord, hear and act! For your sake, my God, do not delay, because your city and your people bear your Name.”

  • Daniel 9:4-19

“While working on the Student Bible my colleague and I made a selection of great prayers of the Bible, which can be read in a two-week period, one prayer per day.  Some are intimate and private while others were delivered in a very public setting.  Each gives an actual example of a person talking to God about an important matter and teaches something unique about prayer:”

  • Philip Yancey, Prayer: Does it Make Any Difference?

I will be intermittently away from the keyboard for much of many of the days for about two weeks.  I had been praying about what I could write during this period, or for this period.  I try to stay a few days ahead in my writing, but with my cataract surgeries, and – confession time a little laziness – along with the heavy doctor visit schedule, I was writing my posts just in time.  (Pardon the typos, if there were any.  Really my biggest problem is changing verb tense, at will, throughout paragraphs, and within a sentence as Yancey does in the quote, but homonyms and blatant typos do exist after several reviews.)  I had just read Yancey’s book, and I thought of his list of prayers.  The chapter on Prayers in the Bible had started with the Lord’s prayer, gone to the Psalms as a whole, and included a general discussion on the prayers of Paul in his various letters.  Then Yancey lists fourteen prayers after the paragraph above.  The thought of this list struck me.  Then when I re-read the page in the book, the words ‘two-week period’ struck me.  Rather than the Holy Spirit striking me out with a third strike, I decided to write a few ideas – maybe some really short posts – for each prayer.  I will copy the Yancey quote and this paragraph for each of the fourteen, so if you read every day, you can skip this with the remaining parts.

The last words of this prayer are powerful.  In a nutshell, we request this not because we deserve it or that we are righteous, but because God has great mercy.

Other than not having the word ‘thank’ anywhere in the prayer, Daniel covers Adoration, Confession, and Supplication quite well.  Still, this is in part an intercessory prayer, coupled with confession as the dual purpose of the prayer.  “We screwed up.  Lord, You are merciful and capable of fixing this.  Please, remember the people who bear Your Name.  Remember Jerusalem, the city that bears Your Name.”

What can we learn from this prayer?  Daniel weaves between words of praise to confession, back to praise, then to supplication, then back to praise.  While the focus in recent years was to focus on Adoration, then Confession, then Thankfulness, then Supplication, Daniel may have a better idea.  With each confession, we weave back into adoration as it applies to that confession.  With each supplication, we weave back into adoration as it pertains to God’s attributes and strength and power to overcome the obstacle that we are admitting we have no power to overcome ourselves.

As mentioned in other posts, we need to simply talk to God.  Rarely do conversations go from one topic to the next without drifting back or adding a third and fourth topic along the way.  If you have a lot to cover in your conversation with God (conversation in that God speaks – if you are listening), you might need notes.  Following the notes can help focus on covering everything on the list, but God was reading the list when you wrote your notes.  Following a list, at the same time, might get in the way of listening for God’s answer.  You are too focused on moving to the next topic.

Soli Deo Gloria.  Only to God be the Glory.

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